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Posts Tagged ‘Decline’

Market share of Smartphone consolidates

glasses online Most of the Smartphone market leaders are sufficiently established along with the bed news for the underlings, which are based upon a latest study from ComStore. The new MobiLens report of ComStore did not consist of any kinds of shifts in the status between the mobile operating systems and major phone manufacturers within [...]

Reseach in Motion to Introduce 7 New Smartphones

The competition in the smart phone and tablet markets has more competition than ever before. BlackBerry use to be the leader in the smart phone industry, but have fallen in a distant third place behind Apple and Google. The iPhone and all of the Android powered smart phones have better features and more apps to [...]

On a mobile? You're a walking accident

Research has confirmed what many of us suspect – walking while talking on a mobile phone increases your chances of having an accident.

Those who cross the road while chatting on a phone raise their chance of being hit by a car by 15 per cent, research reveals.

Older people are particularly at risk because their multi-tasking skills decline with increasing age, the researchers said.

Those who cross the road while chatting on a phone raise their chance of being hit by a car by 15 per cent, research reveals

In two studies volunteers were asked to cross a ‘virtual’ street while either talking on a hands-free phone, listening to music on an iPod or doing neither.

In the first study, 45 college students aged 28 and under who were using phones took 25 per cent longer to cross the same street under the same conditions than those listening to an iPod or doing neither. They were also more likely to be run over.

In the second study healthy adults aged between 60 and 80 were given the same tasks.

The differences between those on and off the phone were even more striking in the older group, said Art Kramer, professor of psychology at the University of Illinois, who led the research.

‘Older adults on the phone got run over about 15 per cent more often than those not on the phone,’ said Prof Kramer.

‘When you are multi-tasking, neither task gets done as well as the brain is, to an extent, overloaded.

‘The problem with talking on the phone is ensuring that prioritisation is given to the task that stops you getting run over – watching where you are going.

‘Sometimes the brain doesn’t manage it’ he added.

Last month U.S. researchers found three out of four men and women making calls on a mobile phone failed to notice a clown riding past them on his unicycle.

Why doctors are not as clever as they used to be

Leading professionals are becoming less intelligent, researchers said yesterday. Lawyers, doctors, accountants and bankers were all cleverer a generation ago, a study found. 

The startling conclusion was reached by academics looking into social mobility. They wanted to find out why those born into poor families in the 1970s were much less successful than those born in the 1950s. 

The research found that as poor children in the 1970s lost the chance of a good education – often blamed on the abolition of grammar schools – they were not able to reach the top professions

Losing it: Doctors, as well as lawyers, accountants and other professionals, are all less intelligent than their generational counterparts

Instead, the places were filled by those from wealthier families – who were not always as naturally gifted. 

The researchers from Bristol University based their findings on IQ tests taken by ten and 11-year-olds as part of two major surveys into the lives of children born in 1958 and 1970. 

They found a decline in IQ among those in the best-rewarded and highest-status professions between the two generations. It means professionals now in their 50s are likely to be brighter than those in their late 30s. 

Ratings from the tests give someone of exactly average intelligence a score of 100, with broadly average intelligence running from 90 to 109. Between 110 and 140 is regarded as superior intelligence. 

It found that lawyers born in 1958 had IQs about 10.5 per cent above the average when tested as children – in the superior bracket. But those born in 1970 had IQs nearer to 7.5 per cent above the norm, putting them into the average bracket. 

Similarly, accountants from 1958 were nearly 10 per cent above average, but only 6 per cent above average in 1970. 

Bankers’ IQs fell from 7.5 per cent above average to 6.5 per cent, while university lecturers dropped from 9 to 7.5 per cent above average. Doctors were 12.5 per cent above average in 1958, but 11 per cent above average in 1970. 

A handful of professions showed that the 1970 generation were at the same level or more intelligent than their older colleagues. 

These tended to be those of lesser status, with less clearly laid out career paths, or with more egalitarian traditions. They included nursing, science, engineering, art and journalism. 

However, the researchers – led by Lindsey Macmillan from the Centre for Market and Public Organisation at Bristol University – offered a crumb of comfort to those who worry about whether their GP is up to the job. 

‘Somewhat reassuringly,’ the study said, ‘doctors and scientists and other medical professionals exhibit the highest IQ test scores over time.’ 

Labour has consistently blamed the fall in social mobility on universities shutting out youngsters from less wealthy backgrounds. 

But critics say the problem lies with comprehensive schools that fail to help poor pupils develop and achieve good grades. 

They point out that the major difference between the two generations born in 1958 and 1970 is that the former were educated in the era of grammar schools. 

Is Technology Producing A Decline In Critical Thinking And Analysis?

As technology has played a bigger role in our lives, our skills in critical thinking and analysis have declined, while our visual skills have improved. (Credit: iStockphoto/Jim DeLillo)

From Science Daily:

ScienceDaily (Jan. 29, 2009) — As technology has played a bigger role in our lives, our skills in critical thinking and analysis have declined, while our visual skills have improved, according to research by Patricia Greenfield, UCLA distinguished professor of psychology and director of the Children’s Digital Media Center, Los Angeles.

Learners have changed as a result of their exposure to technology, says Greenfield, who analyzed more than 50 studies on learning and technology, including research on multi-tasking and the use of computers, the Internet and video games. Her research was published this month in the journal Science.

Read more ….

Is Technology Producing A Decline In Critical Thinking And Analysis?

As technology has played a bigger role in our lives, our skills in critical thinking and analysis have declined, while our visual skills have improved. (Credit: iStockphoto/Jim DeLillo)

From Science Daily:

ScienceDaily (Jan. 29, 2009) — As technology has played a bigger role in our lives, our skills in critical thinking and analysis have declined, while our visual skills have improved, according to research by Patricia Greenfield, UCLA distinguished professor of psychology and director of the Children’s Digital Media Center, Los Angeles.

Learners have changed as a result of their exposure to technology, says Greenfield, who analyzed more than 50 studies on learning and technology, including research on multi-tasking and the use of computers, the Internet and video games. Her research was published this month in the journal Science.

Read more ….