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Posts Tagged ‘Daily Mail’

BT removes dial-up internet service

British Telecom, one of the biggest telephone and internet service providers in the UK, have taken the step of removing its dial-up service, with the reasoning that only a “tiny number” of its customers use that specific service. can i buy cigars online As broadband becomes increasingly popular, very few services now offer dial-up internet, […]

Privacy Concern for Google Auto Tag

Finally Google achieved the patent right over tagging the objects automatically with their respective features, objects and landmarks. For your understanding, with ‘automatic large scale video object recognition’ it can be done without any data and content. That means with just a photo or Video of Big Ben it can be recognized easily without any […]

Finally Facebook is deleting and keeping the best

After years of keeping all the unwanted and inappropriate pictures in the server, Facebook the social networking giant has now finally settled to remove them permanently. You may not be aware of the fact that until recently any pictures that is being deleted from any Facebook account can still be viewed if the user is […]

Salt as addictive as cigarettes, heroin

We all know that fish and chips wouldn’t be the same without salt. However, scientists have now claimed that the yearning for salt stimulates the brain like addiction to hard drugs or cigarettes.They found that the craving triggers the same genes, brai…

Swine flu pandemic to force one in eight to take time off work sick

Almost one in eight workers will have to take time off sick with swine flu in the next few weeks, according to official figures due out today.

This could leave many businesses struggling to run as normal and cripple public services and transport over the summer.

And chief medical officer Sir Liam Donaldson is expected to announce that 30 per cent of the population is likely to be infected during this first wave of the pandemic.

Official government figures also suggest that between 0.1 per cent and 0.35 per cent of those with the virus will die, with up to 100,00 people a day likely to be infected at its peak.

An unwell girl at home in a duvet with tissues (file picture) Nearly one in eight people will be off work with swine flu, it has been predicted

The Department of Health revealed that every schoolchild will be vaccinated against swine flu by Christmas.

Its draft priority list to decide the 30million Britons who will be first to get the jab puts three to 16-year-olds at the top. 

Health authorities have been told to draw up schemes to ensure all pupils get the 

injections, most likely at school or at their GP’s surgery. 

But there was confusion last night about when the vaccine will arrive. Ministers had said the first doses would be here by ‘late August’.


Asmaa Hussain and GP Dr Michael Day both died after contracting swine flu

However, yesterday a World Health Organisation official told the Daily Mail they would not reach Britain until late September or early October. 

Dr Marie-Paule Kieny, director of the WHO’s initiative for vaccine research, also warned that so far the vaccine viruses are taking twice as long to grow as those for normal seasonal flu and this could delay production still further. 

Yesterday health department chiefs revised their original estimate to ‘early autumn’ following consultations with drug companies – although they still say there will be enough for half the population by Christmas. 

The proposal to vaccinate every pupil in Britain in the space of just a few months will be a massive undertaking. 

It comes a week after the death of an apparently healthy six-year-old girl from the virus. 

Chloe Buckley succumbed to the disease last Thursday, just 48 hours after complaining of a sore throat. 

A spokesman for the DoH said: ‘The decision on prioritisation of the population will be taken on the basis of epidemiological evidence, vaccine supply and protecting the capacity of the NHS. 

‘Plans are already being
 made to vaccinate those groups identified as soon as vaccine is available. Until further decisions on prioritisation are made, we have advised that plans should be made to deliver vaccine to the following groups.’

The groups include: schoolchildren; women who are more than three months pregnant; health and care workers; pensioners; and anyone with an underlying health problems or weak immune system. 

Everyone else will have to wait until early next year to be vaccinated, when the rest of the 130million doses ordered arrive. 

The priority list is a draft, and could be revised as evidence comes to light about the risk profile of the virus. 

But it is highly likely that three to 16-year-olds will stay on the list, because in Britain around half of are in those under the age of 20, while worldwide the average age of victims is 19. 

This worries experts because the young took the brunt of the Spanish flu outbreak in 1918-19, which killed up to 100million.


Parents attend a meeting last week at the closed St Catherines School in London, where six-year-old swine Flu victim Chloe Buckley went to school 

Possible reasons for the trend are that older people are likely to have suffered flu more often in their lives, building up a residual immunity to various strains of the virus. 

And younger people – especially schoolchildren – are potentially at greater risk because they are more likely to spend time in large groups. 

Targeting schoolchildren would also help limit the disease’s spread among adults, experts say. 

The under-threes were not put on the priority list as they are confined at home and less likely to be exposed to or spread the virus. 

There has been a rise of almost half in the numbers of people contacting their doctors with fears they have swine flu, according to new figures.

Around 40,000 a week are complaining of flu-like illnesses, with a huge rise among young children particularly.

Only 50.3 per 100,000 reported symptoms between July 29 and July 5 but this leapt to 46 per cent to 73.4 between July 6 and 12. 

Yesterday the British Medical Association revealed it has drawn up a database of 342 former GPs and consultants who will be brought in to treat patients should the epidemic get any worse. 

They will be given a temporary certificate to practise by the General Medical Council that would come into effect immediately. 

A spokesman for the BMA said: of the database: ‘It is in the very early stages. However the doctors would be used to treat patients with swine flu. It is unlikely that they would be involved in any immunisation programs.’

Most Popular Online Media Sites Among Bloggers

Following a list of mainstream media websites that get maximum “link love” from bloggers. Or in other words, these 50 websites are the top sources of news for bloggers and thus are linked (or cited) most frequently from blogs. With a few exceptions lik…

Do These Mysterious Stones Mark The Site Of The Garden Of Eden?

The site has been described as ‘extraordinary’ and ‘the most important’ site in the world

From The Daily Mail:

For the old Kurdish shepherd, it was just another burning hot day in the rolling plains of eastern Turkey. Following his flock over the arid hillsides, he passed the single mulberry tree, which the locals regarded as ‘sacred’. The bells on his sheep tinkled in the stillness. Then he spotted something. Crouching down, he brushed away the dust, and exposed a strange, large, oblong stone.

The man looked left and right: there were similar stone rectangles, peeping from the sands. Calling his dog to heel, the shepherd resolved to inform someone of his finds when he got back to the village. Maybe the stones were important.

Read more ….

'Eye of God': The nebula that watches our tiny world from 700 light years away

The ‘eye of god’ – also known as the Helix nebula – is so huge, it would take a
beam of light two-and-a-half years to cross it

From The Daily Mail:

It stares down at us from the depths of space, watching our tiny world from 700 light years away.

Scientists have nicknamed the image – captured by a giant telescope on the Chilean mountains – the eye of God.

In fact, it shows the death throes of a star similar to our sun, before it retires as a ‘white dwarf’ believed to be the final evolutionary state of a medium-sized star.

Read more ….

Introducing The Gel-Filled Army Helmet That Will Crush Bullets As They Penetrate It

Richard Palmer, CEO of Blue Divine Ltd, with ‘D3O’ shock-absorbing material which will be used to line new British Army helmets

From The Daily Mail:

On the face of it a layer of orange jelly may not sound the best way to protect a soldier’s head from high velocity bullets and shrapnel.

But the British Army’s standard-issue combat helmet is set to be upgraded with a liner made from gooey miracle gel, which responds to a sudden impact by locking instantly into a solid form – absorbing huge amounts of energy harmlessly.

A UK-based technology company was today celebrating a £100,000 contract from the Ministry of Defence to develop its D3O shock-absorbing gel to help save the lives of British troops fighting on the frontline in Afghanistan.

Read more ….

My Comment: The use of nanotechnology at a basic level.

Introducing The Gel-Filled Army Helmet That Will Crush Bullets As They Penetrate It

Richard Palmer, CEO of Blue Divine Ltd, with ‘D3O’ shock-absorbing material which will be used to line new British Army helmets

From The Daily Mail:

On the face of it a layer of orange jelly may not sound the best way to protect a soldier’s head from high velocity bullets and shrapnel.

But the British Army’s standard-issue combat helmet is set to be upgraded with a liner made from gooey miracle gel, which responds to a sudden impact by locking instantly into a solid form – absorbing huge amounts of energy harmlessly.

A UK-based technology company was today celebrating a £100,000 contract from the Ministry of Defence to develop its D3O shock-absorbing gel to help save the lives of British troops fighting on the frontline in Afghanistan.

Read more ….

My Comment: The use of nanotechnology at a basic level.